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North Sea Hydrocarbon Discovery Offshore Norway

The international gas-weighted explorer Neptune continues to be successful in the North Sea, having recently reported a hydrocarbon discovery offshore Norway.
This article appeared in Vol. 17, No. 4 - 2020

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North Sea Hydrocarbon Discovery Offshore Norway

Map showing the location of the 34/4-15 Dugong and hydrocarbon discovery by Neptune in the North Sea, Offshore Norway. © NVentures. The international gas-weighted explorer Neptune continues to be successful in the North Sea, having recently reported a discovery offshore Norway with Dugong 34/4-15. The well proved oil between 3,250m and 3,500m in the Viking and Brent (Upper to Middle Jurassic) Groups after a sidetrack (34/4-15S) helped refine the expected recoverable volumes at the discovery to between 40 and 120 MMboe, compared to the pre-drill estimate of 86 MMboe. This represents the largest hydrocarbon discovery in Norway so far in 2020, and is the first exploration well in License 882. In addition, the Dugong discovery has significantly de-risked another prospect in the license, estimated by Neptune to hold 33 MMboe. 

Dugong lies near the north-west margin of the Viking Graben of the Northern North Sea and north-west of the Snorre and Statfjord giant complex. Whilst this is conventionally considered a mature area Equinor and partners appear to be finding significant new volumes, enabling them to extend the life of existing facilities. They have also made a 20–60 MMboe Brent discovery near Huldra at 30/2-5 and are drilling 34/7-E-4 offsetting the Vigdis field. 

Dugong was drilled by the Deepsea Yantai rig (Odfjell) in 330m of water. Along with Neptune (40%), Concedo, Petrolia and Idemitsu are partners.

This exploration update is brought to you in association with NVentures.

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